Stalling

  STALLING

Slowing down from different places on the board
Turning as a stall
Tail stall
Foot Drag Stalling
Sole drag
Toe drag at tail
Cross step drag
Nose Stalling
Pidgeon toe drag
Cross stance nose drag
Heel drag

 

Slowing down from different places on the board

Picking up speed is important in skating, but sometimes it seems to be the least of your worries. On a skateboard, going down a hill, the tendency is to gain speed. It's worth putting a lot of time into learning different ways to control speed on a skateboard. By stalling, surf style tricks are easier to set up and more comfort and consistency can be attained. As you get more comfortable, you can always try to add speed.

 

Turning as a stall

Turning across the hill or even back up the hill is the best way to slow down when the width of the hill allows.

Here is a sequence of linked turns that go down a narrow hill which is fairly steep. The linked kick carves enable me to take this hill at jogging speed.

Heelside and toeside kick carves are linked one right after the other. It's a very controlled, comfortable descent. The same hill taken on a straight ride would be fast and out of control.

 

Tail stall

The most basic way to stall is from the tail. You wheelie and drag the tail of the board to skid off speed, or you drag your toe which hangs off the tail. If you actually drag the tail of the board, it may help to put a skid of some sort on the tail to protect the board and serve as a brake pad. See the Gear section for more on how to do this.

Here is the stance for the tail stall. The feet are pretty close together, in a narrow stance at the tail. The back toe hangs over. The toe will be used as a brake pad.

I wheelie and drag my toe to slow down. The tail itself scrapes on the street as well. There is a slight turn to the frontside.

I land the wheelie and prepare for the next maneuver. I shift my weight forward slightly.

For a tail drag stall to cross step, a variation on the tail stall that sets up a walk to the nose, see Wave 1.

 

Foot Drag Stalling

Slowing down from different places on the board

Foot dragging is the preferred way these days for downhill longboarders to slow down in road races. They pretty much drag their whole foot, letting it hang off the board. Surf Skating adapts this technique for subtle tricks on flat or gently sloping ground.

 

Sole drag

This is a sole drag, where the entire foot is hung off and the whole length of the foot used for a braking surface. Lots of braking power is available. It's uncomfortable, because the standing leg left on the board has to support the whole weight of the skater. Some downhillers grab onto the nose and squat down for more stability.

Drags can be performed from anywhere on the board. It's possible to drag the sole, the heel, or the toe. Stalls from the tail and middle of the board tend to be easier. It's nice to practice stalls at the nose, because it simulates the stalling action of nose riding in surfing, and it is a nice nose trick to have under your belt.

Braking controls such as dragging a whole foot, carving, sliding, or skidding the tail are rough moves to take off lots of speed. Toe dragging is a subtle way of skateboard braking. People may not even see you do it, and will think you have brakes in your wheels. You can slow down a lot if you drag and turn at the same time. From the nose you can drag and tail slide the board and come to a complete stop easily.

The drags shown here are on gentle hills, for fine tuning speed to set up tricks. Surf Skating drags involve letting the foot hang off and drag. Two feet are still on the board allowing a comfortable stance, but one is hanging off somewhere.

 

Toe drag at tail

This is the basic toe drag. It's not quite the same as the toe drag on page 1, where the toe drags during a wheelie. In this position, I hang my back toe off the tail and drag the tip. There is still some weight on this dragging foot as well as the standing foot, so the stance is very comfortable.

 

Cross step drag

I drag my toe while taking a cross step. There is some weight put on the board as well as the ground, by pushing the sole or side of the foot against the rail. It's a more difficult drag than the tail stall. Your cross stepping and cross stance must be very solid. It helps to turn the foot out so the sole can be angled back a bit. This gets some sole into the braking area and makes a nice clean drag. In this drag, there is some chance of the foot grabbing and the ankle getting twisted. Stretch out and practice going slowly.

 

Nose Stalling

On a long surfboard, the nose is often used as a stalling platform. On this page, I have tried to bring nose stalling to the long skateboard. The front truck is a stable spot, and dragging one foot makes it even more stable. The skater can get more out of the nose of the board by using it as a resting spot to stand and think about the next move. Nose stalls set up maneuvers and tricks. A nose stall followed by a backpedal and kickout would be a good ending to a hill ride.

At first it will seem harder to stall at the nose. Having all the weight and wheels of the board behind you is a disadvantage when you're learning. You will fly off the nose or catch a foot if you make a mistake. I suggest practicing all drags from mid board or the tail. Once you get the feel of it, the nose is the best place to drag stall from. Major speed control is possible. Nose stalling is fun and challenging, and it's perfect for surf cross training.

 

Pidgeon toe drag

If you can't turn out your foot very well, you might turn it in and try to drag it. The stance is regular stance, but the knees have to knock so it looks pidgeon toed. I'm demonstrating the turned in foot stall at the nose. It's pretty comfortable, but the foot might get caught under the nose, or under the wheels. It's also possible to press the foot down on the wheels themselves on the other side and brake this way.

 

Cross stance nose drag

I'm perched on the nose in cross stance and stalling. It gets tricky here because of the weight being all on the nose. Nose stall drags are more sensitive to error. You may fly, so wear pads. Once mastered, lots of leverage can be had to push the foot into the ground effortlessly.

Note the turn out of the foot. The foot won't twist or "chatter", grabbing repeatedly and uncontrollably, because the sole angles backwards, just like as if it were hung off the tail.

Relative to the last picture, I have arched my body back and to the side. Changing the body angle alone changes the pressure on the ground. Experiment with arching to try to get the stall to happen with body angles and not just by stepping harder.

 

Heel drag

If you're losing too much leather off your toe, try the heel drag. Hang your heel off and drag while rocking to heelside to control the braking pressure.

The walk and stall routine is shown in detail on the Wave 2 routine and in the Cross Stepping section.

 

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