Drop and backside turn

  BACKSIDE TURN

Drop and backside turn
Backside turn sequence
Why left?
Drop
Heelside bottom turn
Counterleaning away from turns
See-Saw. Counter weighting with two parts of the body
The value of losing speed

 

Drop and backside turn

The backside turn and cutback uses the entire width of the road. The skater gives a couple of good pushes and gets in the drop position. The drop fades frontside all the way over to the edge of the road.

As the turn starts to go left across the fall line, the skater's weight is shifted back on the tail and onto the inside heelside rail. In this kind of tail turn there is mostly carving and some pivoting. The nose is light, the front wheels or just the inside wheel grazing the ground.

The board comes across the fall line, or center of the road, and heads back uphill. At this point the front hand is pointing uphill, and the skater looks uphill, using these movements to project the board back uphill.

 

Backside turn sequence

This page will give you a "how to" of the wave routine. If you don't understand all the terms or maneuvers you can go back to Surfskate pg 1 and look through the soup and terms pages.

First, using landmarks or cones or backpacks, mark off about 100 yards of hill. Try to do the routine in the time it takes to skate that distance. Of course, if you're practicing to surf at J-Bay, you can pace off about 1/4 mile.  The turn and cutback uses the whole width of the road. This bottom turn is an S turn that fades to one side before turning hard across the road.

 

Why left?

You may wonder why I begin with a backside turn, since backside turns are harder. The reason is only this: since I surf on Long Island mostly and only occasionally elsewhere, I surf a lot of lefts. I'm so oriented to going left that I figured I might as well make this whole site a little slanted to the left. There's plenty of frontside tricks here too, for those of you left riders who are lucky enough to be goofy foot, or those reg footers who surf rights a lot. In addition I surf and skate switch stance a lot and there's a fair amount of switch stance on these pages.

 

Drop

The skater gives a couple of good pushes and gets in the drop position. The drop fades frontside all the way over to the edge of the road. The skater then half shuffles his back foot to the tail as the shoulders are wound up.

 

Heelside bottom turn

As the turn starts to go left across the fall line, the skater's front arm hasn't been thrown left at all. He delays the throw in order to get the most turning power as he's going right across the hill.

When the turn is initiated, the front arm is thrown into the backside turn. The weight is shifted back on the tail and onto the inside heelside rail.

The board comes across the fall line and heads back uphill. At this point the front hand is pointing uphill, and the skater looks uphill, using these movements to project the board back uphill. This is the most difficult part of the turn, defying gravity. The board slows and the skater unwinds into the cutback section of the s turn.

The skater has returned his weight forward, winding up for the next weight shift.

 

Counter rotating to set up a turn

As the turn starts to go left across the fall line, the skater's front arm hasn't been thrown left at all. In fact, he's counter rotating his upper body to the right. This drives the rail in a bit and sets up a later hard rotation to the left. It's a windup so that in a moment he can get a more positive initiation into the turn.

Back turn

When the turn is initiated, the front arm is thrown into the backside turn. The weight is shifted back on the tail and onto the inside heelside rail.

 

Counterleaning away from turns

Turning backside, you should feel your weight go heavily on the inner (heelside) rail. But in contrast to what you'd think, the skater leans over the outside rail, the opposite rail from the inside turning edge. This makes it easy to push hard on the rail with the heels without tipping over. You can actually stand the board up near vertically on the rail without dumping it over. This is not possible by leaning.

 

See-Saw. Counter weighting with two parts of the body

When the weight is shifted back on the tail the wheel becomes a fulcrum and your body is a see saw. There's some counter weighting going on between your hips in the back and your shoulders in the front. The seat hangs out over the tail and is counter balanced by the chest and shoulders, which lean forward. The bend is at the waist, in a pike position. When your body is balanced this way it's real easy to swing the board on the pivot point of the back wheels. Your shoulders leaning up the board and your legs leaning back give you great turning leverage.

Back turn

The board comes across the fall line and heads back uphill. At this point the front hand is pointing uphill, and the skater looks uphill, using these movements to project the board back uphill. This is the most difficult part of the turn, defying gravity. The board slows and the skater unwinds into the cutback section of the s turn.

 

The value of losing speed

To get the feel of turning uphill, you almost have to lose a lot of speed. Sure, you could s turn always going downhill like slalom longboarders and keep your speed up, but it won't do much for your surfing or your style. Get so you can turn uphill and you will find it much easier to climb back up wave faces. You will feel the rush of g forces and know what hard turning is all about.

Back turn

Back turn

Back turn

Back turn

 

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