Backside tail carve turn

  BACKSIDE TAIL CARVE TURN

Backside tail carve turn
Wide stance backside tail carve

 

Backside tail carve turn

Backside tail carves take a little more rotation to execute than frontside tail carves because it's harder to get the same rail angle. You can point your toes more than you can flex your heels, thus frontside gives more rail for less effort.

This time the skater fades the board right while winding up his upper body clockwise.

He shifts his weight back and allows the nose and front trucks to become light. The front arm is thrown counterclockwise.

The skater uses rotation of the upper body to force the board past the fall line (or straight downhill line) and back up the hill.

 

Wide stance backside tail carve

This sequence shows a backside tail turn with a wide stance. A wide stance can give more power and stability. It's still tail weighted, but the turn will not feel as loose.

Instead of on a hill, this is a turn done on a flat surface at a good clip after several hard pushes. It goes then to a cross step to a cross stance. The cross is held and used in trimming the board, in other words turning it in small direction changes from farther up the board.

1) The skater is in the "drop" position, middle of the board, weight on the front foot. The back foot reaches back for the tail. The left hand leads, taking the arm and left side with it to cue the start of the turn.

2) The weight is all the way on the tail. Feet turned in. Front knee locked. The front leg is extended pretty far forward. This is a very stable position.

3) The turn is easing off as the weight is shifted forward. The back foot is unweighted and the skater gets ready to cross step it forward.

4) As the weight is fully transferred to the front foot the skater's arms go back up high to balance for the cross step. The foot is picked up pretty high here. This is not necessary, but done more as a confidence move to show control. The skater is completely balanced on one foot, and yet is still trimming the board through the end of the turn.

5) The back foot has now crossed over and the stance is now changed. The board is being steered in this position onto the other rail. It's now a gradual frontside turn. This cross step went right to the nose, for a cross hang five.

When looking down, think of looking down with your eyes and not your head. Note the head is up, keeping the balance straight over the feet. He is able to see oncoming traffic just by raising his eyes.

6) Starting to trim. The skater is bringing his weight all the way onto the front foot, bringing the chest and hips forward.

The hang five here is not so important as the idea of trimming. Imagine you've just come off the tail of a longsurfboard and have four more feet of board to go. I think of this as a simulation of the surf trimming stance, legs crossed, flattening out the tail rocker after a bottom turn. The next step would bring you onto the "cruise" part of the surfboard, in the normal stance. A step backward would lead to a cutback or a small turn to correct the trim angle.

 

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